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Barbecue 101: 5 Health Tips For An Outdoor Party

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Having an outdoor party with family and friends can be fun. With so much to look forward to at summer gatherings—food, drinks, games and more importantly sunshine—there’s also the tendency to get exposed to various health risks too.

Whether you plan on attending a barbecue or hosting one, there are some basic health tips to consider that would help to ensure your next summer part is not only successful, but safe too.

Here are 5 healthy tips to ensure that you’re have a greattime while staying healthy at your next barbecue.

1.  Mind what you eat

The best part of an outdoor party for most people is the eating. However, during warmer temperatures, germs in any contaminated food can flourish, warns Hilary K. Whitham, PhD, epidemiologist at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Whitham suggests avoiding any food that contains meat or diary that “looks like it’s been sitting outside for a long time.”

“Perhaps it has dry edges or is lukewarm to touch,” she told Healthline.

Specifically, cold foods should be served cold and should remain below the temperature of 40 degrees, while hot foods should equally be served hot—maintaining a temperature of above 140 degrees. That’s why having a backyard fire pit is important when throwing an outdoor party, to ensure your food stays hot and fresh.

“The area from 40 to 140 degrees is what we refer to as the danger zone. That’s the temperature range when bacteria can grow.”

“If food has been left out prior to cooking, such as a platter of chicken wings for the grill, even if it has been properly cooked and the bacteria has been killed, toxins from those bacteria that were growing when the chicken was left out of the fridge can remain,” said Whitham. “Those toxins can make people sick, so both proper chilling and proper cooking are necessary elements of food safety.”

Whitham suggest using a food thermometer to always ensure the food is safe.

“From my perspective, using a food thermometer provides peace of mind in terms of hosting an event… so I’m not worrying if I undercooked anything,” noted Whitham. “Eating things outside isn’t the primary driver of risk, it’s how it’s been prepared and what temperatures it’s kept at until you’re serving it and eating it.”

2.  Wash your hands thoroughly

The regular scene at outdoor parties mostly include people running around, playing games and doing lots of activities that require them to touch objects or people. As a host, it’s very important to wash your hands properly when preparing and serving food, however, partygoers can equally protect themselves by washing their hands thoroughly too.

According to a recent study by the U.S. Department of Agriculture, most people do not wash their hands adequately according to CDC’s handwashing guide.

“This includes scrubbing your hands for about 20 seconds, which is about how long it takes to sing the Happy Birthday song. Brushing your nails softly into the opposite palm, rinsing and then drying [them] on a clean towel, not your jeans,” said Whitham.

3.  Apply sunscreen

An important requirement before heading out to a barbecue or outdoor party is a sunscreen.

According to the American Cancer Society (ACS), it is recommended that sunscreens should be worn every day of the year, however, during instances where lots of time would be spent outdoors, it is especially important to apply it.

4.  Avoid getting overheated

“A barbecue is a good place to think about heat exposure in a holistic sense because it’s a really great venue to get heat stroke and get sick,” said Dr. Mark Morocco, professor of emergency medicine at the Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles, California.

“You have to be careful because you’re outside, you’re likely to be in the sun, and probably will be eating and drinking things that you’re not used to, including alcohol. All of those things are setups for heat exposure illnesses along the spectrum.”

To determine whether you or another partygoer are experiencing heat exhaustion or heatstroke, Morocco advised paying close attention to behavior.

“The reason it’s called heat stroke is because it affects the brain like a stroke would,” he explained.

“If someone is at a barbecue, whether they’re playing frisbee or sitting in their chair, and all the sudden [he or she] shows signs of brain dysfunction, such as behaving oddly, passing out, having a seizure, having trouble getting up and walking or talking normally, or is vomiting and can’t keep water in, these are clues that something really bad is going on.”

“That’s when you want to get that person out of the sun, cool them down, and get to the hospital where they can get aggressive measures of rehydration and observation.”

The best way to protect oneself from heat-related illnesses is by protecting your body from the sun using sunscreens, drinking enough water and wearing proper attire—hats, sunglasses and loose-fitting clothes have a lot of coverage that can help to keep the body cool.

5.  Go easy on the alcohol

It’s near impossible to find a summer party without alcohol, as they often go hand in hand. However, Dr. Robert Brewer, alcohol program lead at the CDC, explains that alcohol is a diuretic, meaning it causes frequent urination.

“People who consume alcohol in hot weather need to be aware that it could cause them to lose fluids, and that in turn could increase their chances of becoming dehydrated and potentially experiencing some other heat-related health problems,” Brewer said.

He also noted that any amount of alcohol consumption can increase risk of injuries and death.

“It’s well recognized that either drinking before or during swimming or boating can substantially increase risk of drowning, injuries, and death. If someone has been drinking even at moderate levels, there will be some increases in relation to injuries, particularly falls,” Brewer said.

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The Real Truth About Coronavirus Revealed by Smart Doctors

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The real truth has been revealed about Coronavirus/COVID-19 by the smartest doctors out there as well as a few other very qualified professionals. I’m taking a temporary hiatus on my video posting because these brave doctors and other top researchers (that have more credentials than me 😉 have been sharing great information lately.

Sure, I’ve said some of the same things but I’m not an MD so when an alternative MD risks his reputation to expose the truth it’s worth paying attention to so check out these videos.

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Here’s what Sharyl Attkisson told me about the 2009 “pandemic”

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The CDC would never launch a fake epidemic; certainly not…

And meet our old friend, Dr. Anthony Fauci, in another context…

History matters.

So I take you back to the summer of 2009, when the CDC and the World Health Organization were hyping the “deadly H1N1 Swine Flu pandemic.”

They were, of course, also urging people to take the new Swine Flu vaccine. On that subject, here is an excerpt from Robert Kennedy Jr.’s Children’s Health Defense (3/27/20):

“For example, [Dr. Anthony] Fauci once shilled for the fast-tracked H1N1 influenza (‘swine flu’) vaccine on YouTube, reassuring viewers in 2009 that serious adverse events were ‘very, very, very rare.’ Shortly thereafter, the vaccine went on to wreak havoc in multiple countries, increasing miscarriage risks in pregnant women in the U.S., provoking a spike in adolescent narcolepsy in Scandinavia and causing febrile convulsions in one in every 110 vaccinated children in Australia—prompting the latter to suspend its influenza vaccination program in under-fives.”

Thank you. Dr. Fauci. Explain to us why you haven’t been downgraded to pumping gas in Death Valley or sent to prison?

Back to the Swine Flu pandemic. In the summer of 2009, the CDC was claiming there were thousands of cases in the US. But behind these statistics lay an unnerving secret. A crime, considering the CDC’s mandate to report the truth to the American people:

Secretly, the CDC had stopped counting cases of Swine Flu.

What? Why?

CBS investigative reporter, Sharyl Attkisson, discovered the CDC secret; and she found out why.

The routine testing of tissue samples from the most likely Swine Flu patients was coming back, in the overwhelming percentage of cases, with: NO SIGN OF SWINE FLU OR ANY OTHER KIND OF FLU.

Attkisson wrote an article about this scandal, and it was published on the CBS News website. However, the next, bigger step—putting out the story on CBS television news—was waylaid. No deal. And CBS shut down any future investigation on the subject. Attkisson’s article died on the vine. No other major news outlet in the world picked up her article and ran with it deeper into the rabbit hole.

Here is what Attkisson told me when I interviewed her:

Rappoport: In 2009, you spearheaded coverage of the so-called Swine Flu pandemic. You discovered that, in the summer of 2009, the Centers for Disease Control, ignoring their federal mandate, [secretly] stopped counting Swine Flu cases in America. Yet they continued to stir up fear about the “pandemic,” without having any real measure of its impact. Wasn’t that another investigation of yours that was shut down? Wasn’t there more to find out?

Read more…

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7 reasons to go bananas for bananas

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(Natural News) Bananas, for the most part, come with a bevy of health benefits, making it a total package all on its own. It’s also one of the most consumed fruits in the U.S., with the average American eating more than 11 pounds of bananas each year (over just 10 pounds of apples, the second most-consumed fruit). Interestingly enough, bananas don’t come from trees — the plant the fruit comes from is technically a herb as the stem does not contain true woody tissue.

Still, no matter where it comes from, bananas offer a range of health benefits, including treatments for digestion, depression, and more. Eating two bananas a day can relieve bloating and increase the number of good bacteria in the gut. People who have mood problems would benefit from eating bananas, thanks to vitamin B6 and tryptophan which help in regulating and boosting mood. The fruit is also great for people with chronic conditions like cardiovascular diseases and diabetes, as it is packed with essential nutrients to improve their condition and help regulate their cholesterol levels.

Bananas have got you covered

People have been eating bananas for a long time, with written records saying that the fruit has been part of our diet for thousands of years. The plant is believed to be native to Southeast Asia, where many varieties of wild bananas still grow today. While the international trade of bananas started by the end of the 14th century, developments in transport — in particular, refrigerated maritime transport — helped make bananas into the most traded fruit in the world. Currently, bananas are grown in 150 countries, with 105 million tonnes produced annually. There are different varieties of bananas; however, the most commonly consumed is the Cavendish variety. (Related: Banana nutrition facts – nine things you probably never knew about this nutritious tropical food.)

In terms of calories, a medium-sized banana only has 95 calories, and it can provide a natural, sustained energy boost without the fat, cholesterol, and sodium of other common snacks. Here are more reasons to add bananas to your diet, if you haven’t already.

  1. It’s high in fiber. Bananas are rich in both soluble and insoluble fiber, which helps a person stay full for a long time. It’s one of the reasons that bananas are often part of breakfast in many regions in the world.
  2. It improves heart health. Foods that are high in fiber, such as bananas, lower the risk of cardiovascular diseases like coronary disease.
  3. It helps with digestion. In Ayurveda, bananas are described to have a sweet and sour taste. The sour taste, in particular, can stimulate agni or the digestive juices, which play a major role in digestion and metabolism build-up.
  4. It’s nutrient-rich. Bananas are packed with essential vitamins and minerals, including B-vitamins such as riboflavin, niacin, folate, and B6; calcium; potassium; manganese; and magnesium. These play a synergistic role in keeping the body healthy.
  5. It’s one of the best sources of potassium. The fruit is known to be a rich source of potassium, which is important in regulating heartbeat and blood pressure. The brain also uses potassium to stay alert. However, those with advanced chronic kidney disease should seek the advice of a healthcare professional before eating bananas, as this may cause potassium levels in the body to rise to unsafe levels.
  6. It regulates blood pressure. The low salt content in bananas, coupled with its high potassium content, make the fruits ideal in managing hypertension.
  7. It fights anemia. People suffering from anemia would do well to eat bananas, given its high iron content.

Bonus: Start your day with this healthy banana bread recipe

The difference with this banana bread recipe over others is that it uses ingredients like whole wheat flour and naturally sweetened honey, rather than using refined flour and sugar which can send a person’s blood sugar through the roof. (h/t to CookieandKate.com.)

What you’ll need:

  • ? cup, melted coconut oil or extra-virgin olive oil
  • ½ cup honey (or maple syrup, if you prefer)
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 cup, mashed ripe bananas
  • ¼ cup milk or water
  • 1 teaspoon, baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon, vanilla extract
  • ½ teaspoon, salt
  • ½ teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1 ¾ cups, whole wheat flour
  • nuts or dried fruits of your choice (optional)

How to do it:

  1. Preheat oven to 325 F (165 C).
  2. Grease a 9-by 5-inch loaf pan.
  3. In a large bowl, whisk the oil and honey. Add the eggs and beat well, then whisk in mashed bananas and milk. (If the coconut oil becomes solid after coming into contact with the cold ingredients, rest it in a warm place like on top of a stove for a few minutes.)
  4. Add the baking soda, vanilla, salt, and cinnamon, then whisk to blend.
  5. Switch to a spatula and stir in the flour gradually until combined. If you have any additional mix-ins, such as walnuts, gently fold them in as well.
  6. Pour the batter into the greased loaf pan and lightly dust with cinnamon on top.
  7. Bake for 55 to 60 minutes. (To see if the bread is properly baked, poke it with a toothpick to the center. The toothpick should come out clean afterward.)
  8. Remove from the oven and let the bread cool in the loaf pan for 10 minutes.
  9. Transfer onto a wire rack to cool for an additional 20 minutes before slicing.

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